Related articles

Amateur Lightweight Sport Bike National Championship Announced for Mopar CSBK in 2018

Next year’s Mopar Canadian Superbike Championship series will include a new class for small displacement production street machines, Amateur Lightweight Sport Bike.  This National series will be aimed at Amateur racers, aged 15 and above, aboard lightly modified OEM models, motorcycles and equipment approved by the CSBK Series.

The new category will use rules based on existing CSBK standards utilizing minimum weights and maximum power outputs, as measured on the official series Dynojet Dyno.  The new class will also use an Approved Equipment List, limiting competitors to racing parts permitted by the CSBK Series.  All competitors will compete with spec Dunlop tires, as do all competitors on the Mopar CSBK tour.

The purpose of this structure is to limit costs and modifications, and place the National Series emphasis on rider talent and development.  Various specific cycle parts, including engine control units, front suspension kits and rear shocks, will be mandated through the Approved Equipment List (AEL).

Details of the AEL will be released this fall, following discussions with suppliers.

The bikes expected to make up the grid for the new Amateur Lightweight Sport Bike category include the KTM 390 singles, Honda 250 and 300 CBR singles, Honda’s 500 twin, Yamaha’s 300cc R3 twin, and the Kawasaki Ninja 250 and 300 models.  This category is established in some regions of Canada and the U.S.A., including Mopar Express Lane Lightweight at the RACE SuperSeries, as well as a similar division started in Europe in support of the World Superbike Championship this year.

“We are really encouraged by the interest shown in these smaller machines,” explained Fred Benjamin, Technical Director of CSBK.  “We anticipate some teething issues with the new class, and some small adjustments might be required in the technical guidelines, but we think this category will produce some exciting racing and help develop the next generation of Canadian road racing talent.”

The new category’s structure will be based on the existing Kawasaki Ninja 300 spec Championship, as introduced at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park in 2015.  This category, for near-stock twin-cylinder Kawasaki street machines, has run with ten races per season over the past two years. 

The Kawasaki will serve as the “index” bike for the class, establishing the relative parameters for the new rules prior to the start of the first season of Amateur Lightweight Sport Bike in 2018. 

East coast ace Brandon Pemberton took the inaugural Kawasaki Ninja 300 spec National Title in 2016, and a new Champ will be crowned in the final events of the Kawasaki National Championship at C.T.M.P. on August 20.

Currently, the class limits for the Kawasaki Ninja 300 spec series include a minimum weight of 340 pounds measured with all remaining fluids immediately post race, and a maximum output of 38 horsepower as measure on the Dynojet Dyno at each venue post race.  Officials anticipate some tweaking of the Technical Guidelines will be required during the early events with the new National category.

Thursday, 10 August 2017 18:15 Published in News


Lawrence Readies for AMP CSBK National Debut

In his first full season as a Pro road racer, former Flat Track Canada National Champion Doug Lawrence of Mississauga, ON, is still getting the hang of pavement life.  Instead of a busy afternoon and evening at a dirt oval, he now digs in for four days at one venue, working up to speed aboard his Pi Racing 2017 Suzuki GSX-R1000.

Of course, fitness is still a big part of his program, and riding a variety of machines in a range of conditions is central to the Lawrence training regime.  During a weekend off in June, Lawrence attended the opening round of the Flat Track Canada nationals at Welland, and won at one of his favourite short track venues.

In the break between round three of the Mopar CSBK Nationals at Autodrome St-Eustache June 25 and the upcoming Honda/Pro Cycle-backed double header weekend at Atlantic Motorsport park in Nova Scotia, July 13-16, Lawrence is busy “training, riding my mountain bike, riding the road bicycle. I went up to Blue Mountain to ride with (fellow Pro) Ben Young, and Kenny (Riedmann, another CSBK Star) joined us for a day.

“We’re also busy with the Suzuki, working on the bike, focused on the mapping and other items with Payam,” explained Lawrence of his tuner Shafinia.

This Thursday, Lawrence will take his new GSX-R to a Riders Choice Track Day at Shannonville Motorsport Park, building his road race experience – an important consideration for someone who started pavement competition less than two years ago. Then this weekend, Lawrence will return to Welland for a regional flat track race before heading to Atlantic Motorsport Park for the next Mopar CSBK event and his continuing quest for Brooklin Cycle Pro Rookie of the Year honours.

“Right now, I’m watching video, trying to get the track figured out,” explained Lawrence, who has not previously competed around the famed Shubenacadie 'Roller Coaster.' “I’ve been studying Jodi Christie, his races against Kenny in Liqui Moly Pro Sport Bike back in 2015,” continues Lawrence.  “The track looks fun, Don Taylor (fellow Canadian FT champ and road racer) says that I’ll love it.  But I think it will be a tough weekend – a lot of the top guys have a good handle on AMP.

“I haven’t grown up around tracks with all that elevation change, and AMP has a lot of different right-hand corners. Then you have that run up the hill onto the pit straight, and I’m not sure how you get your reference points sorted out when you’re looking in the sky!”

One of the details of road racing that is holding Lawrence’s attention is the Dunlop spec slick tires that all the competitors use.

“I guess I’m pretty easy on tires so far, so we’ll see if that holds true at Shubie. I think I’m doing well with my feel with the throttle, but I’m not using too much Traction Control (TC).  I don’t fully understand all of our available systems, I’m still working through the options available and the electronic opportunities.”

So how has the process of learning to race with the Pros on the pavement gone so far?

“The first thing that comes to mind is all the things I learned about over the winter,” starts Lawrence.  “All of those rider aids, you need to learn to use that stuff.  TC, auto blip, wheelie control; you need to focus on getting the wheels down on the pavement and working. I’m not really making many adjustments yet, but that’s coming.

“Getting to grips with a new tire, getting the most from it, that is a challenge too. When you put on a new tire and go looking for the available time, the top guys get that .8 of a second or whatever right away – I have to work up to it.  I have to get settled, I’m not ready right away – it takes me a few laps, and that’s funny, since in flat track our sessions are so short! I need more knowledge, and that leads to more confidence. This is an issue in the early laps of the races too.

“In Flat Track, you’re always making little mistakes, you fix things as you go," Lawrence informs. "But in road racing, if you’re off-line, that could affect half a lap, and you’re losing time. At St-Eustache, I was mistake-free in the main event, and my times were just off Jeff Williams and Samuel Trepanier (both on BMWs).  I was a tenth or two away from those guys, and that is where I need to be.

“In the first nationals of the season, I thought I would pick up the pace earlier in the races, and I took it for granted that would happen. I’m getting there, but it is tougher than I expected to build the pace. I don’t have the outright aggression or raw speed I would like yet, but things are progressing and I’m making some good passes, starting to do what I need to do. I’m getting more comfortable, working on comfort with the speed, working on body position – it doesn’t matter what Jordan (Szoke) or Bodhi (Edie) are doing, not yet for me." 

Once the CSBK tour is complete at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park, August 17-20, Lawrence plans to return to the dirt ovals.  He’ll compete at the London half-mile national, probably on his recently-updated 485 cc Honda framer single, looking forward to London’s “narrow, slippery groove.” After that, he is considering offers to compete aboard a twin for several US teams at the Springfield Mile, a national round where he has performed well in the past.  Following the American Flat Track races, Lawrence aims to complete at the final Flat Track Canada national at Ohsweken on September 2.

Lawrence’s 2017 road racing program is sponsored by Suzuki Canada, Pi Racing, Parts Canada, Pro 6 Cycle, Alpinestars, HJC, Motion Pro, Dunlop. Brooklin Cycle Racing, Town Moto, Vortex, Hot Bodies, John Briggs Motorsports and Two Wheel Motorsport.         

Tuesday, 04 July 2017 05:19 Published in News


Doug Lawrence On 2017 National Plans

“It hasn’t really been a long off-season, but it feels like it at times,” explains former Canadian national flat track champion Doug Lawrence, who will make the move to the Pro road race ranks this season aboard a Suzuki GSX-R1000. Lawrence announced his new Suzuki Canada program for the 2017 Mopar Canadian Superbike Championship at the Toronto Motorcycle Show last weekend.

“I’m excited to get a program to ride the new Suzuki GSX-R1000 in 2017,” confirms the man some call ‘Fresh.’ “I’m excited to go road racing, that’s what it comes down to. I’ve had some offers, with different bikes, from great people, and really I’ve just been trying to figure out what could work the best for me. I appreciate all the help from everyone, and I think the Suzuki program is right for me. My aim is to build with that, to get the ball rolling with Suzuki and their return (to Canadian Superbike).

“I’ll get a bike, hopefully, by mid-March, and get it track-ready,” Lawrence continued. “For me, with my level of road racing experience, it’s essential to just get on the track and get riding. I need bodywork and suspension, but that’s really all I will need to get out and start riding. Then I can get going from there, get the feedback for the people who are working with me.

“I think that usually, with Suzuki, things are pretty close to perfect, and this bike has been in development for some time,” says Lawrence about his weapon for 2017. “I’m confident that the new GSX-R1000 will be good.

“People tell me it doesn’t make sense to test on old tires, things like that, and I do understand the advice,” notes Lawrence, whose entry into the Pro SBK ranks is perhaps the most interesting story of the 2017 CSBK preseason. “But I have only ridden a road race bike for seven or eight days in total. I really just need to get some laps in before we really start development, doing race laps, race-distance testing. I just need to get the bike underneath me, really fell it, and go from there. I’d like to ride Grand Bend, Mosport, Shannonville, before those national rounds. I would like to go down south, I have some good connections in Ohio and Michigan. We’ll see what happens.

“I have to manage my plan, not get too overwhelmed with stuff – I have been so excited over the past few months. I need to get one motorcycle ready, and go from there.”

As far as flat track racing goes in 2017, the former No. 1 plateholder is depending on his mechanic and father, Doug Sr, to lead the charge.

“My Dad is excited for me, and wants to see where I’m going. He’s not a huge road racing fan,” Lawrence laughs. “He knows what I have going on, and he wants me to do it. He’s building another flat track bike for me, to ride in the new Twins class in the States.”

However, Lawrence did admit that following the national CSBK tour will curb his Canadian flat track appearances.

“My riding in the Flat Track Canada national series will be restricted. I raced 26 weekends last year, and I got a bit overwhelmed in the last half of the season. My mind was focused on the CSBK round at Mosport (Canadian Tire Motorsport Park) after I started my first national at St-Eustache, and I know my flat track program suffered for that. I’m not committed to too-too much in the States, and fortunately my dad says ‘Hey, we’ve got this bike ready for you whenever you want to go for it and ride.’ 

“Right now, I have a plan for doing the first two American half-miles before the CSBK nationals start, but I have to dedicated my time and mind to the Suzuki program for the CSBK national series. After the final CSBK round at CTMP, there are still four or five American Flat Track races I can get to in the United States. Those eight or so AMA races are at racetracks I want to ride at as well.

“I have some goals in flat track that I want to achieve, and I feel like I can turn up at those races and be right up to speed.”

As far as support is concerned, Lawrence admits that “there is lots of talking going on, and I have been waiting to get the Suzuki deal confirmed. I have supporters and friends who have helped, and I know they are there for me, and now I have to get out there and work on it. I know that we can’t have the big factory deals of 10 or 20 years ago, but I really wanted to do it, to race the CSBK series.”

Lawrence will be visiting several tracks for the first time, including the home of the famed east-coast ‘roller coaster,’ Atlantic Motorsport Park, in Shubenacadie, NS.

“I’m excited to go places like Shubenacadie,” Lawrence states. “During the off-season, I have told people I actually had more fun racing at St-Eustache then I did at Mosport. I’ve been watching videos, and it seems like you have to be really accurate at Atlantic Motorsport Park. You have to minimize mistakes. It’s another track with a lot of character, lots of uphill and downhill. It’s all new to me.

“I think the Shannonville opener will be really tough; lots of the guys in the series grew up riding there. Grand Bend will be more of a level playing field, not too many of the national guys have a lot of laps around there. Mosport is at the end of the year; I like that place. The speed is a little higher than flat track, and it’s really flowing, but the track is in some ways forgiving. By that time, I aim to be up to speed with the faster group, and I’m comfortable with the drafting.

“I don’t have any specific goals in terms of finishing positions,” Lawrence humbly admits. “I’m more concerned with getting comfortable on the bike, be able to adapt to riding in the Pro ranks on a big bike. The Brooklin Cycle Racing Pro Rookie of the Year is a goal, but that isn’t my only target. I want to do better in every race. I have to wipe the slate clean after every race, good or bad. It’s a rebuilding process and there is a new race track at the next round. I can’t get too high, can’t get too low.

“I’ve been through all of these things in my flat track career,” summarized Canada’s newest Pro Superbike racer. It’s a different discipline, but it’s still racing a motorcycle.”

Saturday, 25 February 2017 08:57 Published in News


Reigning Mopar CSBK Champ Szoke Inducted into Canadian Motorsport Hall of Fame

Legendary motorcycle road racer Jordan Szoke joined the Canadian Motorsports Hall of Fame at their 22nd Gala Induction Ceremony at the Glenn Gould Studio Theatre at the CBC Building in downtown Toronto, Ontario, Saturday evening, October 22.  Born in Bradford, ON., and recently moved to Lynden, ON., Szoke has won the Canadian National Pro Superbike crown a record 11 times, as well as further success in numerous pavement support categories and off-road activities.

Reigning Mopar CSBK Champion Szoke, riding for Express Lane/BMW Motorrad Canada aboard a S100RR, has also earned three perfect seasons on the National tour, unbeaten in 2010 (with Honda) and 2015 and 2016 for BMW.  The 37-year-old won his first career Superbike Feature National at Race City in Calgary, Albert in 1998, winning the title for Kawasaki at the end of the same season. 

Since then, Szoke has built a record total of National Superbike events, with a running total of 59 successes, including 14 consecutive wins heading into the 2017 season.

Szoke was presented to the Hall of Fame Gala audience by Fiat Chrysler/Mopar Executive Jim Kiritsis, one of the key supporters for the Waznie Racing squad.

“When you start racing, you think about the next race, maybe the next win, the next Championship, the next season,” explained Szoke from handsome CBC stage.  “Then you get to a certain point, and you consider what you have achieved, how far you have come – and it makes you feel old!”

“I think that most people know that with motorcycle racing, the wear and tear is a major issue with your career, with the amount of time you can compete at a top level having so much to do with injuries, recovery, and all those factors.

“I am very fortunate, that things have gone very well for me over all the years at all the tracks in all the series,” smiled Szoke.  “I might limp a little when I get up in the morning, but by the afternoon everything is working fine!  I want to race as long as I can be competitive at a high level, for a few more years.

“I think when you listen to all the of the other inductees in their speeches, there is a clear theme of the help and guidance of our mechanics, for the technical side, as well as the important support of family of friends.  Some of those people belong in the Hall of Fame too.”

The last motorcycle roadracer to join the Canadian Hall of Fame was British Columbia’s Tom Walther, a star in the late 1980s who died racing Superbikes in Japan.  Walters was inducted in 2012.  Three-time Canadian Superbike Champion Michel Mercier, currently the owner of the FAST Racing Scholl, joined the Hall in 2008. 

The year before, 1980s AMA Formula One/G.P. class star Alan Labrosse, also a successful car racer and currently the owner of Autodrome St-Eustache, was inducted. 

Szoke’s induction marks the first 1990s (and later) era motorcycle racer to be inducted, and the rare acknowledgement of a competitor still active and at peak form.

The Canadian Motorcycle Hall of Fame have their next Ceremony next year in Montreal, Quebec on February 25.  Among the roadracers entering the two-wheeled Hall in their 11th annual event is Miguel Duhamel, Pascal Picotte and Peter Hurst.    

Sunday, 23 October 2016 15:33 Published in News


Michael Taylor Fundraising Party Next Tuesday night in Toronto

Fans and team-mates of veteran Canadian roadracing stalwart Michael Taylor are throwing a party in support of the Twice National Overall Champion, badly injured during practice for the final CSBK National events of the season at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park, ON, on Friday, August 19.  Taylor has undergone two surgical procedures on his badly damaged leg following his turn two tumble, and is looking ahead to a repair for his injured shoulder, too.

Taylor is expected to be recovering for some time, with limited ability to work.

Long-time Taylor supporters and Canadian motosport personalities Pat Gonsalves and Pat Barnes are organizing an event at the Queen Victoria Pub at 2240 Midland Ave. in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough, on Tuesday, October 4, 2016, from 6 PM to 11 PM.  The Queen Victoria Pub is located on the West side of Midland Ave, North of Progress, M1P 4R9.

A major silent auction will be part of the festivities honoring the lengthy and successful career of Taylor, who has competed for Triumph, Kawasaki, Honda, Yamaha, BMW, Ducati with a host of teams across the globe. 

Other entertainment over the evening is said to include “the vocal stylings of Michael Taylor.”  Besides his renovation career and history in motorcycle competition, Taylor is also a regular on the Toronto Choir circuit.

Tickets are just $ 15.00 each, and include a BBQ.  There will be a cash bar. 

Seating is limited, and supporters are asked to please contact Pat Gonsalves ASAP to reserve seats: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 416-822-5207.  Tickets will be delivered at the door.

Pat and Pat look forward to a great evening in support of Michael Taylor next week – please join them.

Wednesday, 28 September 2016 15:25 Published in News


Coelho Qualifies at New Jersey MotoAmerica

Quebec’s Alex Coelho placed fourth in the Superstock 600 Last Chance Qualifier at New Jersey Motorsport Park, part of the final MotoAmerica National of 2016.  This means that Coelho will compete in this afternoon’s Supersport/Superstock 23 lap race, his debut on the American tour.

The 2015 Shoei Premium Helmets Amateur Sport Bike Champion on the Mopar CSBK National Tour, Coelho placed second overall in the final points standings for the 2016 Liqui Moly Pro Sport Bike Championship, earning a podium at Autodrome St-Eustache in his rookie Pro Mopar CSBK season.

Coelho had a problem-plagued trip down to New Jersey, and hadn’t ridden the venue until Friday’s practice with his regular Black Sheep Racing Kawasaki ZX-6R Ninja.  Coelho qualified with a lap at 1:29.8, but in the race dropped his best tour down to 1:27.6, an encouraging sign for this afternoon’s race.

Fellow Canadian-based Kawasaki rider Jeff Sneyd, a Pro front runner on the Canadian National tour in the 1990s, continued his “unretirement” program with his third race in the past four weeks aboard his just-purchased Ninja.  After returning to action at the Mopar CSBK races at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park in August, Sneyd competed in the SOAR event at Grand Bend and then travelled to New Jersey.

In the Last Chance Qualifier, Sneyd started 11th and was running in a top spot, likely to qualify for the main race, before he ran off-track.  He rejoined to charge to sixth, running a best lap of 1:28.3 – good enough to make the main if not for his problems.

Saturday, 10 September 2016 13:54 Published in News


Breaking News! Brett McCormick back on a Superbike at Mt. Tremblant

2011 Mopar CSBK Canadian National Superbike Champion Brett McCormick of Saskatoon, SK, rode on a road race track for the first time in almost four years at Le Circuit Mount Tremblant in Quebec this week.  A guest of Marc-Olivier Labelle’s Tremblant Superbike Track Day group, McCormick took part in three days of on-track activity at the famed and fast 4.26 km, 15 turn facility.

25-year-old McCormick used a Kawasaki ZX-10R Ninja supplied by Ross Millson Racing, and tuned at Tremblant by Scott Cameron.  The BMW Motorrad Canada squad that took McCormick to the National title five years ago included Cameron among the crew. The following year, McCormick went to Europe to ride World Superbike in 2012 for the Czech-based Effenbert Liberty Ducati team. 

McCormick’s final race in 2012 was at the penultimate World Round at Portimao, Portugal, where he earned a close fifth in the wet opener and ninth in dry race two.  After that, the squad folded, and McCormick opted to head home to study Engineering at the University of Saskatchewan.

Now entering his fourth year of post-secondary education, closing in on his degree, McCormick attended the most recent Mopar CSBK National event August 21 at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park in Ontario, and wanted to get back on a Superbike.

Support for the Tremblant trip came from Tremblant SBK, Ross Millson Racing, SC Motosport, Pro 6 and Shoei.

“There were two main goals with the trip,” explained McCormick following his last afternoon session on Wednesday, September 7.  “One was to see if riding a fast bike on a fast track would still put a smile on my face, and two, to see if I still had a feel for the riding and tuning of a modern superbike.

“When I left the pit lane for the first time, I really felt like an alien, it took me a few laps to cruise around and get comfortable, finally get my knee on the ground after about three laps,” admitted McCormick.  “But it was cool how quick it all came back.

“I have never had any trouble going from bike to bike, getting use to the handling and power delivery, then working to get the most from it,” continued McCormick.  “I was impressed with the Kawasaki, sure it wasn’t a World Superbike, but it was fast and worked really well without much adjustment. Day one we were on a used front Dunlop slick and a new rear we put 40 laps on, and just trying to get comfortable.  After that, we started to work through things, and it didn’t take much to get the chassis feel I prefer. Scott has worked with me before and we can get a lot done together.

“It was nice to remember the direction to go to get things working, and get the process going to make changes and evaluate them quickly.  I was really happy with how much my feel came back, starting with the front end and then we got the rear working and could try some new tires and really have some fun.”

No official lap times were recorded, but observers say that McCormick was on the national Pro pace by mid-afternoon of his third day, when the pair opted to stop early and pack up. 

McCormick now heads home for university, and is considering a return to Pro national-level road racing activity for the 2017 season.   

Thursday, 08 September 2016 08:49 Published in News


Szoke Struggles on Sunday in MotoAmerica New Jersey

A slightly sore Mopar CSBK Canadian National Champ Jordan Szoke is heading home from the final 2015 MotoAmerica at New Jersey Motorsport Park September 13, following a frustrating return to the American National tour.   Both Szoke and his 2015 BMW S1000RR, sponsored by Express Lane, Joe Rocket and BMW Motorrad, are a little the worse for wear.

Szoke earned 15th overall in the opening, shortened, combined Superbike/Superstock Feature race, twice interrupted by rain and incidents.  In the second, 26 lap Feature on Sunday afternoon, Szoke was eliminated in a first turn crash when he was collected by the Suzuki GSX-R1000 of Elena Myers.

“Race one didn’t go very well,” explained Szoke.  “We didn’t really have the speed I thought we should have had, all weekend.  With the rain in Q, and various issues, we just never seemed to get things going.”

“The first race was going OK, but I still had some issues with the front end.  Then they stopped things because of the rain, and then I didn’t get a good start on the restart.  I got around Elena, then I started after all the Superstock guys, they were mainly in a group, not far in front of me.”  Szoke’s Canadian spec BMW was competing in the Superstock class.

“Then it started to rain a bit, and I rolled out of it, I was there to have fun, and didn’t want to take to many chances when it was slippery,” continued the ten time Canadian Superbike Champ.  “But this time they waited a while to Red Flag it, and Elena got past again.”

Between the two Feature races, Ohlins suspension guru Jon Cornwell discovered that Szoke’s BMW had a problem with his front suspension.
“Jon found a blown O-ring in our fork, so I had no compression damping in my fork, probably since the start of the weekend,” confirmed Szoke.  “So we were really excited for race two, looking forward to seeing what difference a good fork could make!”

“We ended up going about half a second faster than Jodi (outgoing CSBK Champ Christie, a front runner at NJ 2014) did when he got that good sixth here last year, and it shows how deep the field is now – the fork fix could have made a real difference.”

“So I got a good start in race two, I was on the outside of Chris Fillmore’s KTM Superbike into turn one, my knees on the ground, and I got hit so hard from behind – I was in the air and there was no bike under me!”

“Elena hit me from behind, I don’t know what she was thinking, there was no room between Chris and me.  She got the tail section and exhaust, since I was already leaned over, and I was lucky not to get run over.  Now I’m bruised up, hurt my elbow, wrecked my leathers and made a mess of my beautiful motorcycle.”

“This was one of my worst AMA Nationals ever, my first crash on the 2015, in fact it was my first crash since I fell in a Q session in Canada back in 2012!  That crash was my fault, but this one wasn’t.  But that’s racing – that’s the way it goes sometimes.”

Overall, Szoke still views the tip south on a constructive note: “I enjoyed the track, I loved the competition, the MotoAmerica people were awesome.  Wayne Rainey and all of his people were so friendly, it was almost like a family reunion.”   

Monday, 14 September 2015 13:25 Published in Reports, Results & Points


Beaubier wins MotoAmerica SBK Championship in New Jersey

The 2015 MotoAmerica National Championship Series came to its conclusion at New Jersey Motorsport Park on September 13, and Josh Hayes won the battle while his Monster Energy Yamaha YZF-R1M team mate Cameron Beaubier won the war.  Hayes took a dramatic final race victory after a thrilling last lap fight with the runner-up Yoshimura-Suzuki GSX-R1000 of Roger Lee Hayden.

Meanwhile, Beaubier played it cool, earned a conservative sixth overall and third in the Feature Superbike category, good enough for his first overall National Feature race crown.  Yamaha took ever win in every class in the debut season for MotoAmerica, only KTM breaking the streak with the spec singles class!  The top works Yamaha racers used matching yellow and black “bumble bee” paint scheme for Sunday’s events only, celebrating the firms’ 60th race anniversary.

“I’m just speechless,” explained Beaubier from the podium.  “My R1 has been rippin’ all year, it’s so fun to ride, and I can’t wait until next year.”

“Riding alongside Josh is awesome – he is the first guy I want to beat, and he is a true Champion,” said Beaubier of his 40 year old team-mate and outgoing Champion Hayes.

“I talked a lot of trash before these races about how I was gonna win them, and I thought I might have to eat some crow,” smiled double victor Hayes.  “I found myself in the right place again, even with all that pressure from Roger.  I am so proud to win ten races on the year, that is more than half of them, and I’m going to kick Cam’s butt so bad next year.”

The Superstock class title already belonged to Red Bull Roadrace Factory Yamaha R1 pilot Jake Gagne, and Gagne confirmed his star status with a solid third overall, taking the Superstock victory.  Next on the road was third overall Taylor Knapp, second in Superstock, battling with third Superstock finisher Joshua Day.  Yamaha swept the Supersport podium with their new-in-2015 R1.

Earlier in the day, Hayes had won the red flag interrupted penultimate race in the Feature class, in a day interrupted by some rain and very high winds.   In an event that wound up getting scored after 14 of a scheduled 25 laps, fast starter Hayes held off Beaubier for victory, although neither racer knew it was the final lap!

Hayden was third overall in the opener, while Gagne was just four seconds back to win the Superstock division. Kyle Wyman was fifth on his Yamaha, second in Superstock, with Day going 6th overall, third in class.

Reigning Mopar CSBK overall Canadian National Champion Jordan Szoke was 15th overall in the first Feature race, placing Szoke 9th in the Superstock division, after a hectic race.  Szoke retired on the first lap of race two, a frustrating end to his record-setting 2015 campaign with the Express Lane/Joe Rocket/BMW Motorrad S1000RR.

In support race action, former American Superbike Champion Josh Herrin won the Supersport closer on a dry track for the Wheels in Motion Yamaha squad, coming on top of a wild battle with team-mate Joe Roberts and Garrett Gerloff’s works Yamalube Yamaha YZF-R6. J.D. Beach, who had already clinched the Supersport title for Yamaha, wound up fourth, at the back of the fight for first.  Canadian rising star Ben Young was ninth on a Hindle-backed Yamaha.  

In Bazzaz Superstock 600 race two, Bryce Prince took victory by more than 12 seconds from Travis Wyman, both on Yamaha YZF-R6s.  Ruthless Racing’s B.C. based Darren James retired his Yamaha mid-race, while Quebec-based rookie Pro Stacey Nesbitt did not start with her Honda.

Sunday, 13 September 2015 17:14 Published in News


Szoke Ready for SuperPole in New Jersey

Jordan Szoke was 17th quickest this morning at New Jersey Motorsport Park in the final practice for tomorrow’s two races in the MotoAmerica Superbike/Superstock category. Aboard his regular, Mopar CSBK Canadian National crown winning Mopar Express Lane/Joe Rocket/BMW Motorrad S1000RR, Szoke was again ninth quickest in the supporting Superstock section of the Feature class.

Next up for Brantford, ON based Szoke is the split SuperPole sessions, scheduled for mid-afternoon, when rain is expected at the New Jersey shore’s facility.

“My comfort level is getting there,” explained Szoke of the busy, 27 rider session.  “The goal of comfort is to make things less work.  We made some ride height changes to the chassis, and that helped make things easier to do physically.”

As Ohlins suspension guru Jon Cornwell made electronic adjustments to the wheelie control portion of the BMW, Szoke continued:  “We also put in some new brakes, and it took me a few laps to get my head around that.  Then I just needed a few clear laps, but that somehow didn’t work out!”

“Traffic was really bad for me that session, and the track is narrow in some sections, you have to be careful.  I was out with Cameron (Beaubier, second quickest overall for Yamaha) in the middle of the session, and the Chris Fillmore (works KTM rider) crashed right in front of us.  After that red flag, I was going to go out with Danny Eslick on that quick Aprilia, but then he had some kind of a mechanical problem.”

“Right now I’m not too concerned about our laps times, I just want to see what we can do with the bike; we haven’t played with the Traction Control feature much in Canada this year, our tracks are so point and shoot, but we’ll see what we can come up with.”

While unwilling to speculate about possible weather conditions, most of the regular MotoAmerica racers expect Szoke to do well if it is wet for final qualifying in the two SuperPoles sessions. 

Saturday, 12 September 2015 13:21 Published in News


Page 1 of 2