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Flat Track Canada Season Kick-Off Party - May 13

Join Flat Track Canada and Inside Motorcycles as we celebrate the start of the 2017 Flat Track Canada national racing season on Saturday, May 13 at Barangas on the Beach on the shores of Lake Ontario in Hamilton, ON!
 
Come and hang out for a few hours beachside! See new 2017 motorcycles and race bikes on display, mingle with racers and fellow enthusiasts, check out our video and photo displays, and take in the waterfront view as we stir up some excitement for 2017's nine-race national championship series.

WHEN: SATURDAY, MAY 13, 6-10 PM

LOCATION: BARANGAS ON THE BEACH
380 Van Wagners Beach Rd, Hamilton (map below)

FREE ENTRY AND FREE PARKING!*
DESIGNATED PRIORITY MOTORCYCLE PARKING!
EXCELLENT FOOD AND BEVERAGES AVAILABLE!
VENDORS, NEW MODELS, RACE BIKES, PHOTO AND VIDEO DISPLAYS!
*Paid parking across from venue - refundable with food or drink purchase. Free parking located in nearby municipal lots north and south of venue. Free bike parking available on site.

RIDE IN
Grab some friends and ride into Hamilton. Priority parking for motorcycles is available at the venue!
 
LEARN ABOUT FLAT TRACK
Find out about races in your area, sign up for a race school, check out the race bikes or just learn more about one of North America's fastest-rising motorsports!
 
HARLEY-DAVIDSON JUMPSTART PROGRAM
Harley-Davidson Canada will bring its Jumpstart program, which allows anyone to twist the throttle and run through the gears on a stationary Harley-Davidson Street 750!
 
HAVE A BITE
Barangas has a reputation for good food to go with the atmosphere. Come hungry!

INSIDE MOTORCYCLES
Snag a free copy of the latest issue, plus the first 100 people to drop by the booth and say "Flat Track Canada rocks!" will receive a FREE, no-strings-attached, 6-month subscription to Inside Motorcycles!
 
EVENT FACEBOOK PAGE
Stay updated on happenings and info by visiting the Facebook event page here! https://www.facebook.com/events/120997798452487/
 
For more information or to inquire about becoming a vendor, please contact Graeme Jones at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (416) 526-0042.


About Flat Track Canada: The mission of Flat Track Canada is to promote and build awareness of flat track motorcycle racing in Canada and rebuild the former glory of the sport; to captivate an audience in such a way that they become true, dedicated race fans. In 2017 the organization will run a nine-race national Canadian championship series and also sanction provincial series in five provinces. Visit www.flattrackcanada.com for more info.

About Inside Motorcycles: Published 10 times per year, Inside Motorcycles is a Canadian motorcycle magazine based in Toronto, ON. Since 1998, Inside Motorcycles has been bringing readers across the country a Canadian perspective on motorcycling. Coverage includes new models tests, Canadian racing, touring, adventure riding, vintage motorcycles, spotlights and lifestyle pieces. Inside Motorcycles celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2018. For more information, visit www.insidemotorcycles.com.

Friday, 05 May 2017 14:56 Published in Industry News


Honda Canada introduces CRF250 Rally

MARKHAM, ON (November 8th, 2016) –The CRF250 RALLY is ready for weekend adventure, long distance tour or the daily commute, with long travel suspension, large-disk brakes, excellent weather protection from the CRF450 RALLY-inspired bodywork and an impressive cruising range. Engine performance combines solid bottom-end torque with substantial top-end power.

A 250cc dual purpose motorcycle covers many bases: it slips easily through congested traffic as is equally comfortable on rougher roads and trails all thanks to lightweight and slim proportions matched with superb maneuverability as well as the great suspension, ground clearance and seat height. The 250cc dual sport package delivers a fun and comfortable ride in almost any situation. A whole new range of two-wheeled opportunities to both experienced and new riders.
With styling DNA drawn directly from the HRC CRF450 RALLY Dakar racer, the CRF250 RALLY brings something new to the market. It not only looks ready to compete in a desert stage, but also delivers a real taste of adventure to riders who prefer a light, easy-to-manage machine. Around the world or around the block, the CRF250 RALLY is good to go.

Mr. Eiji Sugiyama, Large Project Leader (LPL) 17YM CRF250 RALLY
“The rally racer replica segment is an exciting one for us, with the global, human appeal of everything that Team HRC is fighting to achieve in the Dakar Rally. We really wanted to build on the capabilities of the CRF250L and open up new opportunities for new and experienced riders. So, with the CRF250 RALLY we set out to make a motorcycle that looks like HRC’s CRF450 RALLY factory machine, is fun to ride both on and off-road for weekend adventures, comfortable to tour with and useful and practical for daily life. It brings the spirit of Rally-raid racing to every ride.”

Model Overview
The CRF250 RALLY uses the CRF250L as its base, and adds a wide range of changes that make it a unique proposition in the market. Styling inspiration draws fully on the HRC CRF450 RALLY race machine. At the front, the ‘floating’ screen, fairing and radiator shrouds provide wind protection, with the rest of the machine showing off minimal MX style. The asymmetric headlights are LED, as are the indicator lights.
A large fuel tank allows extensive range, and the new digital dash includes a fuel gauge and tachometer. Long travel suspension and high ground clearance enhance its long-distance off-road ability and a larger floating front disc –The engine boasts solid bottom-end torque coupled with substantial top end power thanks to changes compared to the original CRF250L, which include revised PGM-FI and throttle body, a new airbox, connector tube and lightweight exhaust.

Key Features
Styling & Equipment
The CRF250 RALLY is designed to cover distance and its styling reflects this. Derived from the parts used by the CRF450 RALLY, the ‘floating’ screen, upper/lower fairing and side shrouds effectively shield the rider to offer excellent defense against the elements. Hand guards offer further protection, both for the hands and the brake and clutch levers.
From the machine’s mid-section back, the style is MX-sharp, with side panels and a seat/tank interface that help the rider move freely. A skid plate protects the machine’s underside and the gear lever features a folding tip. Seat height is 895mm, 20mm taller than the CRF250L.
The headlight is a compact, asymmetric dual LED unit while the rear light, LED indicators and number plate bracket tuck discreetly away. Cohesively laid-out, the digital dash features a speedometer, tachometer plus fuel gauge and clock.
The 10.1L (including 1.6L reserve) fuel tank delivers an approximate range of over 320km thanks to fuel consumption of about 33.3km/l (WMTC mode). The flat filler cap is hinged for rider convenience.
The CRF250 RALLY comes finished in Honda’s Extreme Red racing colour as a base, with black and white accents inspired by the HRC factory machines.

Chassis
The CRF250 RALLY’s frame is constructed from steel, with twin oval-section main spars and a semi-double cradle. A wheelbase of 1,455mm is matched to a 28.1° rake with 114mm trail and ground clearance of 270mm (15mm more than the CRF250L). Wet weight is 157kg.
A new 43mm Showa inverted fork shares the same 250mm stroke as its sibling, but with 50mm extra overall length. Light weight and rigid, one side houses the spring while the other provides damping control. Both spring rate and damping have been optimized to suit the CRF250 RALLY’s adventurous long-distance aspirations. A 17mm front wheel spindle (2mm larger in diameter) improves strength and handling feel.
Pro-Link rear suspension features a 265mm axle stroke, 25mm more than the CRF250L plus a leverage ratio revised for ride comfort. The Showa shock absorber is a single tube design with 40mm diameter cylinder.
The tapered aluminum swingarm incorporates a monoblock casting that provides the correct rigidity balance and reduces un-sprung mass. Extruded aluminum is used for the chain adjustment collar.
For extra braking power a 296mm floating wave-style disc is worked by a two-piston caliper.
Stylish black Alumite aluminum rims (21-inch front/18 rear) mark the CRF250 RALLY out and wear block pattern enduro-style tires (front: 3.00-21 51P, rear: 120/80-18M/C 62P).

Engine
The CRF250 RALLY’s 250cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder DOHC engine’s performance is focused on bottom-end torque and high rpm power, plus a linear delivery. Peak power of 18.2kW is delivered @ 8,500rpm with peak torque of 22.6Nm arriving @ 6,750rpm.
The PGM-FI feeds the fuel/air mixture through a 38mm throttle body and draws air from the airbox via a direct connecting tube. The exhaust muffler has a diameter of 115mm, houses the catalyzer and uses two chambers. A large-bore downpipe helps the engine breathe and make more power.
The engine uses a compact roller/rocker arm valve train and cylinder head, with bore and stroke of 76x55mm. An offset cylinder reduces frictional losses while the piston itself incorporates a special surface material, plus a molybdenum coating. The oil pump features an internal relief structure that prevents aeration of relieved oil.
The crank journal employs a half-split, press-fit metal bearing while the crank bearing uses a cast-iron bush, reducing weight, smoothing the engine and strengthening the rigidity of the case housing, minimizing the internal diameter change due to thermal expansion.
A primary balance shaft further reduces vibration and the six-speed gearbox and clutch are manufactured to cope with the extra stress of riding off-road. The 10.7 kW heat-release radiator features a thin guide-ring cooling fan to maintain even temperatures at low speeds.

Tuesday, 08 November 2016 16:43 Published in Industry News


From Street to Track: Track Days, Part 1

There is nothing that can replace the one-of-a-kind adrenaline rush that accompanies pushing the limits of a modern motorcycle. Having accepted that the most appropriate setting in which to do so is in a controlled environment, I dedicated the 2016 season to the track. After investing time and resources into preparing the bike, accumulating gear and equipment, and completing a race school, the next step was all about getting seat time, and for me that means track days.

The premise of a track day is really simple. For a fee you get to take your bike out onto the track and put in as many laps as the allotted time or your personal stamina allows. This particular type of adventure starts when you register for the session. For those who have never participated in a track day, the cost may seem steep, as much as $250 for the day, depending on the track and organization putting on the event. However, the math is really quite simple. If you get pulled over doing 160 km/h on the street you will, after a mandatory court appearance, incur fines that could reach a thousand dollars or more, plus legal fees. Conversely, when you hit 160 km/h, 200 km/h or even faster on the track, you get an ear-to-ear smile.

The other thing that typically happens during the registration process is that you are asked about which group level you will be riding in, usually described as novice, intermediate or expert. Some organizations provide very specific criteria while others leave it to you to assess. Basic rule of thumb is to be honest. If you are new to the track and have never completed a high performance on track school, you need to be in the novice group. At the same time if you are an expert level racer with black number plates on your bike, lapping in anything other than the expert group will quickly become a frustrating experience.

Upon arriving at the track it is time to focus on unloading and setting up your bike, gear and equipment. For those of us who transport our bikes in the back of a pickup truck, unloading and loading can be a challenge. The good news is that motorcyclists being motorcyclists, there are always multiple people ready and offering to help. If it is your first track day or a new track, one piece of advice is to ask for a pit area close by the organizer's tent or booth, and let them know. Their business model is built around you becoming a repeat customer, so they will definitely want you nearby where they can make sure you are having a good time and finding everything you need.

Once you are setup and have signed in, the next item on the agenda is the rider's meeting. This is the time when the organizers will welcome you, tell you what to expect during the day, review current track conditions and cover procedures and safety protocols. It doesn't matter where you are or how much experience you have, these meetings are not only mandatory but they are important. Not every group or track has the same rules, and something as universal as a red flag can have different implications for riders on the track at the time of the incident.

With all of the formalities out of the way, take some time to walk around the pit area to say hi to old friends and make some new ones. Then head back to your pit, get into your riding gear and warm up your bike. Before you know it they will be calling your group and it will be your turn to head out in the track, which is where we will pick up next time.

Thursday, 27 October 2016 14:17 Published in From Street to Track with Patrick Lambie


Photo Gallery: Flat Track Canada @ Flamboro Downs!

Better late than never, they say. On that note, here are our photos from the Flat Track Canada round held at Flamboro Downs racetrack outside of Hamilton, ON on Saturday, August 6. Enjoy and share around!

Friday, 19 August 2016 11:54 Published in Reports, Results & Points


New issue of Inside Motorcycles ON SALE NOW!

The July/August 2016 issue of Inside Motorcycles is making its way into mailboxes and onto newsstands across the country!

Monday, 13 June 2016 13:56 Published in Current Issue


BMW Motorrad GS Trophy 2016 wraps up from southeast Asia

Munich. The fifth BMW Motorrad International GS Trophy, the 2016 Southeast Asia edition came to a close, after seven hard days’ riding, with a spectacular finale on Saturday, March 5. With the competition still in the balance right up to the final special test, it was a tense finish – decided in favour of Team South Africa who kept their nerve to secure the nation’s first victory in the event after twice placing runner-up. Let´s have a look back on a week packed with high temperatures, offroad riding, friendly people and adventures in the jungle.

The fifth edition brought together 19 teams (comprising 57 riders plus 19 embedded journalists) representing 25 nations for a seven-day over-1300 kilometre trek through the forests, jungles and mountains of Northern Thailand. The riding was possibly the most technical yet, as the riders guided their
BMW R 1200 GS bikes along single-track trails more akin to enduro racing than adventure competition. Temperatures matched those of the South African edition in 2010 – running into the high 30ºC range – and with high humidity it was one of the hotter, sweatier GS Trophies!

The start came at the Rim Doi Resort, in Chiang Dao at 8.00am on the morning of February 28, and while unseasonal heavy rain had washed out the planned course for day one, the riders were still treated to some excellent off-road trails before hitting the first – and possibly physically the toughest – special test, ‘Broken Bridge’. Such themes are by now familiar, long days in the saddle with always some challenging riding, combined with special tests that challenge the riders’ teamwork, their problem solving skills, often their strength, as well as their bike riding. As ever, the riders would reach the nightly bivouacs well-exercised.

The 2016 edition again saw the event grow, with 114 motorcycles on the tour and an entourage of close to 200 people (riders, marshals, medics, caterers, organisers and more). As ever, the motorcycles – BMW R 1200 GS and GSA – were up to the task; occasional puncture repairs on the trail tested the practical skills of the riders while crash damage gave the BMW Motorrad mechanics a few hours work each evening; but the engines and chassis never gave up. The latest GS bikes were praised for their ease of use, great rider aids and sheer ruggedness. As before, the competitors were won-over by the bike’s character as much as the sheer capability of these iconic machines.  

Team South Africa wins.

Team South Africa has been one of the strongest teams in every edition of the GS Trophy since their debut in 2010. They missed out on the win then, by just one point, and came close again in 2014, so the win this year was especially savoured. Thorough preparation meant the team were always in contention – they were in fact the team to beat – but John Harris, Charl Moolman and Byron Coetsee were winners on every level, winning as many friends as points.

Team UK and Team Germany were their nearest competitors and the unrelenting efforts of the two teams kept the outcome of the event in question right up to the very last test. And while the strength of Team South Africa could not be denied, it was fitting that the runner-up position should be shared by these two great teams (Team UK having won in 2010, Team Germany in 2012).

Three new teams took part in 2016. Team China made an impact right from the start, having given up their international air flights and instead choosing to ride to the event on their own GSs! Four days in the saddle saw them ride up to the Shang-ri La Hotel in Chiang Mai for the official opening – along with some 60 supporters, most also BMW-mounted. They made quite probably the most impressive entrance to the event yet. And Team China proved a competitive team, too, strong and well-practiced they took an impressive 7th place on their debut.

Team Southeast Asia might have been less successful, but nonetheless brought much colour to the event, good humour, and found they enjoyed their ‘home’ course as much as the visitors.

The third new team were the International Female Team. Easily the most popular team in the event, Stéphanie Bouisson (France), Morag Campbell (South Africa) and Amy Harburg (Australia) showed bike-handling skills equal to the men (in fact sometimes superior). They would have finished higher if they hadn’t been so punished by the strength-based tests, but as Amy reported, they were never defeated – not even in lifting the 238kg GS over a 1.5-metre tree trunk – it just took a little more time for them than for the men. The team was much welcomed by the men, and cheered-on all the way, but again as the girls explained, this was the same for all teams – every team supports everyone. It’s truly a band of brothers – and sisters.

At the finish, Team South Africa’s Byron Coetsee spoke for his teammates about their win:

“Relief is the first emotion, then happiness. With South Africa’s record in the event – we’ve come second twice, even losing by just one point – then to finish like this is like the weight of the world has been lifted from our shoulders. We share this moment with Roger, Gerber, Warren and all the previous team members from South Africa!”

Tuesday, 15 March 2016 13:23 Published in Reports, Results & Points


Flat Track Canada Round 7 Race Report - Woodstock half-mile

As the Flat Track Canada road show hit the half mile in Woodstock, Doug Lawrence found himself at the top of the Open Expert standings looking down at some fast riders who were hoping to take over his view from the top. With a slight points lead over Tyler Seguin, Lawrence was hoping to make it two races in a row with a checkered flag and hopefully getting him one step closer to that illusive Canadian number one plate.

   Don Taylor was looking to make a statement in Woodstock and history appeared to be on his side. Taylor had missed the first few rounds of the FTC season but had won the recent half mile race in Leamington and had also guided his Harley to the win in the previous two seasons in Woodstock. As the Open Expert race entertained the crowd, it was indeed Taylor who found himself at the front of the pack while in another case of history repeating itself, Lawrence was caught playing catch up after a less than stellar start. With a couple of laps to go it looked like Taylor had things well in hand and even the announcer counted Lawrence out at this point (sorry Doug). Then, much like previous races in Paris and Leamington, Lawrence put on a superhuman charge over the last couple of laps to take the win over Taylor. With the win, Lawrence extended his points lead over Seguin who worked hard to minimize the points damage by grabbing third.   

   Nick Wenzler took his second victory of the year in DTX Expert with a great ride but the riders finishing second and third impressed as well. After grabbing the win in Wheatley, rookie Expert Dave Pouliot rode that momentum to a fine second place in Woodstock while another rookie Expert, Kyle VanConant, surprised some veterans with a strong ride to finish third.

   Intermediate DTX action saw a great battle for the win between Brodie Buchan and Braden Vallee. In the last couple of laps these two swapped the lead numerous times with Buchan finally grabbing the victory by the slightest margin over Vallee. In the Open final it was all Buchan however as he opened a commanding lead and left the rest of the pack to fight over second. Late in the race, Vallee made a miscue however which hurt him dearly in the points chase. While safely in second, Vallee came upon a lapped rider in turn three and ended up laying the bike down to avoid a collision. With Vallee going down, this promoted Cody Marentette to second and William Bellerose to third after they both took evasive action to avoid Vallee and his bike.

   Novice action saw the familiar script of Dustin Brown and Trent Pickle looking fast all day. DTX action saw Brown grab the win over Pickle while rookie flat tracker Bentley Thistlethwaite had a great ride to finish third in front of his hometown crowd. In the Open final, Brown once again had the lead until something soured on his bike causing him to pull off on the back straight. This handed the lead and eventual victory to Pickle with Thistlethwaite crossing the line in second ahead of Jerrett Bellamy who had his best ride of the year to finish third.

   In Youth action a few of our American friends grabbed the checkers as Brandon Newman, Nathan Peacock and brother Jacob Peacock all figured out the fast way around the Woodstock half mile. 50cc chain action saw Spencer Whittam grab the win ahead of Easton Ventoso and Makenna Nicholson. With the victory in Woodstock, Whittam has now climbed into a tie for the points lead with Ventoso.

   Loudest cheers of the day may have been for fan favourite Hunter Bauer. While leading his heat race in the 85 class, it became very apparent that Bauer was having bike problems as he started losing positions. As he came out of turn four for the last time, Bauer's bike expired as the rest of the field rode past. In a true testament to his never give up attitude, Bauer then proceeded to push his bike down the front straight nearly all the way from turn four. The appreciative crowd cheered loudly for him as the exhausted Bauer finally hit the finish line and slumped over his bike. Great stuff !!!

With Woodstock over the next race will take place in London this weekend on the fast 5/8 mile at the Western Fairgrounds.

                                     Woodstock Top Three
   Vintage: Louie Dinicourt, Don Payne, Brad Kitto
   VET: John Parker, Rick Gunby, Rob Churchill
   ATV Open: Peter Grison, Darcy Ryksen, Shawn Waite
   ATV Youth: Max Johannsen, Tanner VanMourik, Spencer Whittam
   50 Shaft: Brayden Hutchison, Alyssa Armstrong, Holden Fairbairn
   250 Novice: Brandon Newman, Hunter Bauer, Kyle Lonnen
   85: Nathan Peacock, Brandon Newman, Kyle Lonnen
   65: Jacob Peacock, Brandon Keys, Easton Ventoso  
 
Flat Track Canada would like to thank Parts Canada, Deeley Harley Davidson, Honda Canada, Suzuki Canada, Kawasaki Canada, Diesel Equipment Limited, Dunlop Tires, Klotz Canada, Inside Motorcycles, Grand River Powersports, Sturgess Cycle, Town Moto, and JD Graphics.
 
   
 
 
 
For Results and Standings please visit  
 
http://www.flattrackcanada.com/2015-standings/ 

Friday, 14 August 2015 10:49 Published in Reports, Results & Points


Joe Rocket signs exclusive distribution deal with Gamma Powersports

Orillia, August 10, 2015 - Gamma Powersports is excited to announce the expansion of its motorcycle catalogue offering with the addition of the complete Joe Rocket Canada product line. Joe Rocket continues to lead the way in the Canadian powersports apparel market with its fresh designs and innovative styling.

"We are extremely excited about adding such a highly respected brand to our portfolio of products. Joe Rocket has always supported the Canadian powersports community with a strong commitment to the network of retailers across Canada and that's exactly the kind of partners we are looking for," said Mike Shean, President of Gamma Powersports.

Bruce Parker, President of Joe Rocket said, "Gamma Powersports has deep roots within our industry and has been servicing the Canadian market for over 40 years. You don't have that kind of longevity without a strong team that's committed to customer service and has a deep understanding of our lifestyle.”

Joe Rocket has been building quality motorcycle gear for the sport bike/cruiser/touring markets for 22 years. They have led the way in new concepts and are responsible for many of the advancements in technology currently in use across North America.


To view the new 2016 line up, please visit www.joerocketcanada.com

Monday, 10 August 2015 14:44 Published in Industry News


Flat Track Canada race report - Round 6, Wheatley Thunderfest

One day after dealing with blazing heat and some great racing, the Flat Track Canada travelling road show was at it once again. Sunday saw the group head to Wheatley to race at the short track on the Erie Ramblers club grounds. Long regarded as one of the most unique and coolest tracks around, the Wheatley track is always fun and Sunday certainly didn't disappoint.

After some of them riding 750's the night before, the Experts went to smaller displacement machines for the short track. Although the bikes were smaller the thrills were huge as once again the best riders in Canada put on a great show for the fans. Making a rare appearance on his beautiful 450 framer it was Doug Lawrence, making up for the night before, who came away with the win in Open Expert. Early leader in the race was Chris Evans but unfortunately for Evans he slid out in corner two shortly after Lawrence got by him. Local ace Nick Wenzler had a strong ride through the pack to finish second while new points leader Tyler Seguin took home third. A surprising non-factor in the final was reigning number one Don Taylor who had looked like a man on a mission in his heat race bouncing off the wall on the back straight while going for the win.



Rookie Expert Dave Pouliot surprised perhaps everybody except himself in taking the win in Expert DTX. While the others behind him were sliding and bobbing, Pouliot looked smooth and fast on his way to his first Expert victory. Taylor was a factor in this race as he grabbed second while Wenzler was once again in the mix and was able to grab third. Congratulations Dave!

 

Intermediate once again belonged to Brodie Buchan as he grabbed both wins to go four for four on the weekend. Track knowledge, skill, and great starts went a long way for Buchan and he just couldn't be caught. Braden Vallee and Cody Marentette swapped positions from the night before with Vallee grabbing second in both races after having to make up ground from some harrowing starts.

 

 

The Novice class was dominated for the second day in a row by the trio of Dustin Brown, Trent Pickle and Luke Rahm. Finishing order was the same in both races as Pickle found himself sandwiched between Brown and Rahm on his home track. 

 

Boyd Deadman proved to be the master of the light on Sunday grabbing the holeshot in both 85 Youth and Novice 250 action. While unable to hold the lead until the end in both races, Deadman did have a couple of great rides to finish second to Hunter Bauer with Jimmy McCullough rounding out the top three.

 

VET action saw Steve Ball, winner from the night before, take a hard tumble in turn three after making contact with Rob Churchill. With Ball out of commission, Churchill was able to grab the checkers ahead of Dan Doreen and Windsor firefighter Paul Renaud.

 

A special thanks to all the Erie Ramblers and Flat Track Canada crew for putting on such a great weekend in such extreme temperatures. Bravo !

Other Classes Wheatley Top Three

Youth 65: Adrian St. Amand, Brandon Keys, Spencer Whittam

Youth 50 Chain: Adrian St. Amand, Spencer Whittam, Easton Ventoso

Photos Courtesy of David Dudley.

 

Flat Track Canada would like to thank Parts Canada, Deeley Harley Davidson, Honda Canada, Suzuki Canada, Kawasaki Canada, Diesel Equipment Limited, Dunlop Tires, Klotz Canada, Inside Motorcycles, Grand River Powersports, Sturgess Cycle, Town Moto, and JD Graphics.

   

For Results and Standings please visit  

  

http://www.flattrackcanada.com/2015-standings/   

 

Monday, 27 July 2015 14:00 Published in Reports, Results & Points


Flat Track Canada race report - Round 5, Leamington Thunderfest

With record temperatures and a record number of entries, the beautiful half mile in Leamington once again played host to the first round of Thunderfest. As the mercury in the thermometer hit the mid thirties, it proved to be a sign of things to come as action on the track heated up as well.

Open Expert action saw a mix of bikes take the grid but on this night the Harley Davidson XR 750 seemed to be the bike of choice. Making his first appearance of the season was defending number one plate holder Don Taylor and he was back with a vengeance as he opened up an early lead after taking the green. As the laps counted down, Doug Lawrence was making steady progress on Taylor as his Harley seemed to like the brushed off track as well. As the leader took the white flag, Lawrence put on one final charge but most likely needed one more lap as he fell just short at the line to Taylor. Tyler Seguin rounded out the podium in third finishing ahead of New Yorker Ryan Wells.

Earlier in the evening Seguin had perhaps put on the ride of the night in the Dash for Cash. Using all of his talent and even more of the track, Seguin held off the larger displacement bikes to take the lion's share of the cash in the exciting four lap sprint.

In Expert DTX action it was hometown boy Nick Wenzler crossing the line first surprising a few of our heat race winners. Wenzler was the sole Canadian representative in the top three as Parker Norris and Ryan Wells took the final two spots on the podium. A red flag early in the race caused by Devin Pfeiffer going through the fence in turn one was extremely unfortunate not only for Pfeiffer but for Kyle Vanconant as well. Vanconant had grabbed the holeshot in the first try at completing the race and was doing a superb job holding off everyone at the front of the pack before the red. Vanconant was still able to put in a solid ride after the restart and ended up fifth.

Intermediate action once again turned into the Brodie Buchan show as he grabbed convincing wins in both Open and DTX action. The script was the same in both races as Buchan grabbed the early lead and stretched it out while everyone else in the field tried to play catch up. Cody Marentette and Braden Vallee took second and third respectively in both races, but both riders came up a little short in trying to run with Buchan.

Novice action saw perhaps the best race of the day and easily one of the best of the year. The DTX race was one for the ages as Trent Pickle and Dustin Brown were virtually side by side for the final four laps of the race. Pickle did everything he could to hold the bottom line while Brown blasted around the deep stuff at the top of the track. As the final few laps counted down the two riders would be separated by fifty feet of track in the corners only to meet up beside each other on the straights. As they excited turn four on the final lap, Pickle made the low line work as he held off Brown by inches at the line as Pickle's hometown crowd roared its approval. Rounding out the top three was another hometown boy as motocrosser Luke Rahm had a great ride to take third.

 

VET action saw Steve "RA RA" Ball take his first ever win at Leamington as he took the victory over Leamington's own Wayne Young and Rob Churchill.

Youth 85 action saw Hunter Bauer take the win over Jimmy McCullough and Brandon Newman but the big news in this class was the number of entries. Nineteen riders were signed up for this class which meant when the green lights flashed for the final there were a few riders watching instead of racing. Great stuff seeing this many riders in the the youth classes !

The day was a special one as the riders and spectators on hand paid tribute to the late Jesse Phibbs. A rising star on the flat track scene, Phibbs passed away in 2010 after a very unfortunate incident at the Indy Mile. Saturday saw most of the riders on hand do a lap of honour in Jesse's memory followed by Brodie Buchan turning some laps on Jesse's Rotax. Eyes in the crowd were moist as the we all remembered the fine young man that will forever be linked to Thunderfest.




Other Results from Leamington

Novice Open: Dustin Brown, Trent Pickle, Luke Rahm

Vintage: Kevin Lambert, Mark Fairfull, Brad Kitto

Youth 65: Brandon Keys, Jacob Peacock, Maguire Scott

Youth 50 Chain: Spencer Whittam, Olivia Farkas, Easton Ventoso

Youth 50 Shaft: Alyssa Armstrong, Hannah Musson, Emily Biekx

Novice 250: Brandon Newman, Hunter Bauer, Boyd Deadman

 Photos by Chris Rahm 

 

Flat Track Canada would like to thank Parts Canada, Deeley Harley Davidson, Honda Canada, Suzuki Canada, Kawasaki Canada, Diesel Equipment Limited, Dunlop Tires, Klotz Canada, Inside Motorcycles, Grand River Powersports, Sturgess Cycle, Town Moto, and JD Graphics.

For Results and Standings please visit  

http://www.flattrackcanada.com/2015-standings/   

Monday, 27 July 2015 13:54 Published in Reports, Results & Points


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