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Honda introduces 2014 CBR1000RR and CBR1000RR SP

Honda introduces 2014 CBR1000RR and CBR1000RR SP

Written by  on Tuesday, 05 November 2013 14:09

The original 1992 Honda CBR900RR Fireblade created a revolution in open class Super Sport
motorcycle design. Its combination of big-hitting litre-bike power and light, middleweight-size
chassis created a breathtaking – yet very useable – riding experience on the street and on the
track.

From 2004 to date the CBR1000RR’s story is one of constant evolution and development.
Honda’s ‘Total Control’ concept – a design philosophy running continuously through every
single model – has resulted in a motorcycle in total balance, combining exceptional
performance and handling with a satisfying ability to extract the very best from every rider.

Victories in the World Super Bike (WSB) championship and all-conquering success at the Isle
of Man TT, with average lap speeds of 130mph plus over 37.73 miles of real roads racing, is
testament to the CBR1000RR’s innate capacity.

For 2014 it is once again evolution for the CBR1000RR – The feeling of Total Control is truly
appreciated on the street and at the track and is no doubt part of the reason that Honda’s
CBRs enjoy such a strong reputation for everyday usability. Also contributing to that reputation
is a level of comfort rarely found in a machine this aggressive; add race-spec electronic ABS
and you begin to understand why this incredible machine is so popular.

CBR1000RR
Model Overview

The CBR1000RR’s chassis – die-cast twin-spar aluminum frame, 43mm inverted Showa Big
Piston Fork and rear shock are unchanged for 2014. Its 999c four-cylinder engine however has
received extensive work on the cylinder head, improving inlet and exhaust gas flow and
combustion efficiency. The result is extra peak power and improved mid-range torque.

Key Features

The cylinder head inlet and exhaust ports have been re-shaped and polished with the
combustion chambers ‘gas-flowed’ to improve efficiency.

The valve seats have also been revised to match the cylinder head work and the intake
funnels are now ‘slash cut’, a design used in WSB. A nickel-silicon carbide (Ni-SiC) surface
treatment on the cylinder walls reduces friction and ensures reliability. The engine now makes
more power and revs higher, harder for longer.

The Programmed Dual Sequential Fuel Injection system (PGM-DSFI) has been remapped to
match the revised cylinder head and up-rated power and torque output

The MotoGP-derived slipper clutch ensures full power transmission together with ultra-smooth
gear shifting and light feel at the lever. In the critical hard braking, back-shifting corner-entry
phase it decreases the torque passed from engine to the rear wheel, reducing the chance of
traction loss and increasing stability.

The exhaust pipe diameters are smaller, increasing torque and a new for 2014 vertical
connecting pipe balances pressure between cylinders two and three. The integral high-
absorption catalyser has a larger volume: together with the oxygen sensor fuelling is constantly
tailored for the most efficient combustion mixture.

Chassis

The CBR1000RR’s die-cast aluminum twin-spar frame balances the strength, rigidity and
lightness required for Super Sport-specification handling and a favourable power-to-weight
ratio. The CBR1000RR’s riding position is more aggressive for improved control, leverage and
acceleration on the street or the track. The footpegs are set 10mm back and the handlebars
are wider plus the new wind screen delivers improved high-speed aerodynamics rather than
wind protection.

The aluminium gull-wing swingarm is deliberately long. It operates through MotoGP-derived
Unit Pro-Link rear suspension to deliver outstanding traction and rider feedback.
A Showa 43mm inverted telescopic fork employs Big Piston Front Fork technology. Their
unique construction – with larger damping volume – effectively reduces hydraulic pressure
generated under compression and extension. Spring preload and rebound and compression
damping are fully adjustable.

The rear suspension features a fully adjustable Showa Balance Free Rear Cushion. Instead of
a conventional single-tube layout, the system uses a double-tube design: the damper case and
an internal cylinder. The damper piston has no valves – instead the damping force is
generated as displaced oil passes through a separate damping component.

This allows pressure changes within the shock to be controlled more smoothly than normal.
And because there are no small amounts of oil being used at high pressures damping
response and reaction are improved, and damping force can function smoothly during load
input.

The Showa Balance Free Rear Cushion delivers more consistent damping, plus improved
shock absorption and greater traction as more consistent contact is maintained between rear
tire and the ground.

For well-balanced steering the second-generation Honda Electronic Steering Damper (HESD)
monitors speed and tailors damping force accordingly. It enhances stability at high speed by
minimising the effect of sudden steering angle changes, while also leaving the steering
unrestricted – and light – at low speed.

Working hand in hand with the sophisticated Showa suspension, rigid 12-spoke cast
aluminium wheels offer superb handling and rider feel. Machined from a single piece of
aluminium – to save weight and optimise rigidity – the four-piston front brake calipers are
radially mounted and work 320mm floating discs. The rear single-piston caliper and 220mm
disc add subtle levels of control.

Equipment

A new compact car-style ‘wave’ design ignition key offers improved security and greatly
reduces the chance of breakage. Also new is the fuel tank cap – it uses an improved breather
design for better venting.

The multi-function LCD instrumentation with a cockpit display dominated by the digital bar-type
linear tachometer that scrolls left to right as engine speed increases. Beneath this are the main
numerical readouts: gear position, coolant temperature, speedometer, clock/lap time, trip/fuel
efficiency/fuel consumption and odometer/numerical tachometer. At the bottom of the display
are lights for headlight high beam, neutral and indicators.
Clear and easy to read in all light conditions, the tachometer has four display modes:
Conventional, which uses black LCD segments to show current rpm; Reverse, which employs
black LCD segments to show remaining rpm. Peak Hold indicates rpm in the conventional way
and also leaves a tell tale segment showing the peak rpm achieved while Single Segment uses
a single block to show current engine speed. In addition the odometer may be switched to
display engine rpm numerically.

The lap timer features four modes. The display can also show fuel consumption, average fuel
efficiency, distance travelled and total elapsed time. To assist debriefing after a session, lap
time recall mode shows the fastest lap time and the lap on which it was set.

To ensure gear shifting at the optimum engine rpm, the 5-level shift indicator display uses
highly visible white LEDs, adjustable for brightness. They illuminate sequentially as engine rpm
rises, finally blinking at a chosen pre-set rpm (default is 13,000rpm but this can be set between
4,000rpm and 13,000rpm). The interval between sequential illuminations can also be set at
0,200 or 400rpm.

Electronic Combined ABS

Honda’s high-performance electronically-controlled Combined Anti-lock Brake System
(electronic Combined ABS) has been used in every race since 2010 in the IDM German
national championship by the Holzhauer Racing team, whose rider Karl Muggeridge won the
series in 2011. It has also been used by the Honda TT Legends team in the Endurance World
Championship series since 2011.

Electronic Combined ABS has a high level of precision and adjustability, due to the fact that it
is a ‘brake-by-wire’ system. A dedicated ECU converts hydraulic pressure from the front and
rear brake into an electronic signal passed to power units, which in turn generate hydraulic
pressure at the calipers.

The system’s electronic control has numerous benefits. Firstly, it eliminates the “pulsating”
effect on the brake lever associated with conventional motorcycle ABS technology. It also
allows the system to be activated instantly as soon as tire slip is detected, minimising loss of
grip and eliminating the possibility of locking a wheel. It also means there is absolutely precise
control of the speed at which the brake callipers are activated. The result is extremely stable
and neutral bike behaviour, giving the rider maximum feel and confidence, even under hard
braking.

Available Colours: White with Stripe
Price TBD

All specifications are provisional and subject to change without notice.


CBR1000RR SP

1000rrrsp


Once in a great while there comes a high performance machine so perfectly balanced and
intuitive to operate that it becomes one with its operator, achieving seamless integration. The
CBR1000RR-SP is such a machine. The open-class CBR has built somewhat of a loyal army
of fans around the world over two decades. And in response to demand from hard-core
performance enthusiasts Honda – for the very first time – in 2014 is producing the
CBR1000RR-SP.

Model Overview

In Japanese to give something ‘edge’ is to add polish. And for the dedicated track day goer
that’s exactly what the CBR1000RR-SP has been given: ‘Total Control’ with an extra edge.

Today more and more engineers are using computer assisted electronic aids to bridge the gap
between man and machine, but in doing so something is lost, the feeling of control is
diminished, the reward to the senses faded, the experience compromised. This track-focused,
yet fully road legal, limited edition Sport Production version of the standard CBR1000RR not
only looks special – it is special.

Noticeably absent on the CBR1000RR-SP are electronic aids of any kind; engineers instead
took a different, perhaps more laborious, approach. Starting with arguably one of the most
balanced sporting platforms available, the CBR1000RR, engineers added top shelf
componentry known for excellent feel, feedback and control.

The SP chassis wears circuit-ready Öhlins suspension front and rear, plus Brembo four-piston
mono bloc calipers, and has frame revisions and new top and bottom yokes to suit. A sleek
solo seat saves weight and positions the rider exactly where he needs to be, while Pirelli
Supercorsa SP tires provide the finishing touch. Confident they had the right hardware,
engineers then started the real work, hours and hours were spent painstakingly testing and
fine-tuning the communication and feedback between rider and machine, until they were sure
they had the rewarding experience they desired. Decades from now, historians may look back
and proclaim that the CBR1000RR-SP was one of the last pure sporting machines ever built.

Key Features -Chassis

The CBR1000RR-SP’s die-cast aluminium twin-spar frame is based on that of the standard
machine, with modifications to match the Öhlins suspension. Tuning the frame to increase
rider feedback with the suspension’s different performance parameters proved critical during
development and the rigidity balance around the rear suspension mount has been revised to
give more flex – and therefore feel – for traction.
The Öhlins inverted front fork has an outer diameter tube of 55mm (1mm more than the Showa
unit) and the revised top and bottom yoke use a steel, rather than aluminum, steering stem.
The top yoke itself features high precision CNC machining and features a greater surface area
in contact with the forks, improving rigidity. As on the CBR1000RR the aluminium gull-wing
swingarm operates through MotoGP-derived Unit Pro-Link rear suspension.

The second-generation Honda Electronic Steering Damper (HESD) monitors speed and tailors
damping force accordingly. It enhances stability at high speed by minimising sudden steering
angle changes, while also leaving the steering unrestricted – and light – at low speed.

The CBR1000RR’s riding position is more aggressive for improved control, leverage and
acceleration at the track or on the street. The footpegs are set 10mm back and the handlebars
are wider: A new rear subframe – with no need to support a pillion – is lighter and the revised
seat material firmer. A new wind screen delivers improved high-speed aerodynamics rather
than wind protection.

There are also subtle changes to raise the centre of gravity and improve fast side-to-side
transition: seat height is higher and ground clearance increased. This results in a superior
bank angle of 47°12’ compared to 46°20’ for the standard machine.

Specialists from Öhlins worked with Honda’s engineers and test riders during all stages of
development. Fully adjustable, the 43mm inverted fork and rear shock were developed
specifically for the CBR1000RR-SP, to offer superbly balanced all-round performance and
greater potential for better lap times at the track.

The 12-spoke cast aluminum wheels perfectly complement the new suspension setup. The
front wears super-sticky, track-ready and fully road legal Pirelli Supercorsa SP tires.
Brembo mono block four-piston calipers were chosen because of their compatibility and
performance potential with the Öhlins fork. The caliper body is standard but Brembo
manufactured special pistons for use in the CBR1000RR-SP, with pad material designed to
give consistent and linear feel when braking hard from high speed.

Engine

The CBR1000RR-SP’s 999.8cc, 16-valve inline four-cylinder engine has the same cylinder
head updates as the CBR1000RR. The inlet and exhaust ports have been re-shaped and
polished with the combustion chambers ‘gas-flowed’ to improve efficiency.

Where the CBR1000RR-SP differs is the selection of pistons and con-rods as the engine is
manufactured. Essentially a factory blueprint, each batch of pistons and rods are weighed and
those that closely match the middle tolerance – and each other – are used. This injects an
even greater level of balance into the engine, especially at the high rpm generated on track.
The oil pump shaft is also lighter and redesigned to reduce frictional losses.

A nickel-silicon carbide (Ni-SiC) surface treatment on the cylinder walls reduces friction and
ensures reliability. At 35mm (from 38mm) the exhaust pipe diameters are smaller, increasing
torque and a new vertical connecting pipe balances pressure between cylinders two and three.

The Programmed Dual Sequential Fuel Injection system (PGM-DSFI) has been remapped to
match the revised cylinder head and exhaust. It delivers precise fuelling and an accessible
power delivery, perfect for driving hard out of slow-speed corners. At throttle openings of up to
25% the PGM-DSFI delivers relatively fine and consistent changes in power and torque output

– perfect for extracting maximum drive at full lean. As throttle openings become larger, the
changes in output are progressively greater and the overall result (at the throttle) is an engine
that responds with great accuracy to rider input, giving superb feel from the rear tire and highly
usable, linear acceleration.
The MotoGP-derived slipper clutch ensures full power transmission together with ultra-smooth
gear shifting and light feel at the lever. In the critical hard braking, back-shifting corner-entry
phase it decreases the torque passed from engine to the rear wheel, reducing the chance of
traction loss and increasing stability.

Combined with the chassis changes ‘Total Control’ is elevated to a whole new level and the
CBR1000RR-SP has the potential to turn in significantly lower lap times than the standard
machine.

Equipment

The CBR1000RR-SP uses a new ‘wave’ design ignition key; it offers improved security and its
compact size greatly reduces the chance of breakage. Also new is the fuel tank cap – it uses
an improved breather design for better venting.

Instrumentation is a multi-function LCD with a cockpit display dominated by the digital bar-type
linear tachometer that scrolls left to right as engine speed increases. Beneath this are the
main numerical readouts: gear position, coolant temperature, speedometer, clock/lap time,
trip/fuel efficiency/fuel consumption and odometer/numerical tachometer. At the bottom of the
display are lights for headlight high beam, neutral and indicators.

Clear and easy to read in all light conditions, the tachometer has four display modes:
Conventional, which uses black LCD segments to show current rpm; Reverse, which employs
black LCD segments to show remaining rpm. Peak Hold indicates rpm in the conventional way
and also leaves a tell tale segment showing the peak rpm achieved while Single Segment uses
a single block to show current engine speed. In addition the odometer may be switched to
display engine rpm numerically.

The lap timer features four modes. The display can also show fuel consumption, average fuel
efficiency, distance travelled and total elapsed time. To assist debriefing after a session, lap
time recall mode shows the fastest lap time and the lap on which it was set.

To ensure gear shifting at the optimum engine rpm, the 5-level shift indicator display uses
highly visible white LEDs, adjustable for brightness. They illuminate sequentially as engine rpm
rises, finally blinking at a chosen pre-set rpm (default is 13,000rpm but this can be set between
4,000rpm and 13,000rpm). The interval between sequential illuminations can also be set at
0,200 or 400rpm.

Available Colours: Tri Colour
Price TBD

All specifications are provisional and subject to change without notice.

-- Honda Canada

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Last modified on Tuesday, 05 November 2013 14:23
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Graeme Jones

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